TechTalk #12 - Die Cutting Too Deep?

At Wilson, we're always focused on the technical aspects of flexography. TechTalk is your quick snapshot of key topics in our industry. Let us know what you think.


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Die Cutting Too Deep?

This is a fairly common die cutting issue. As with most challenges in this area, it's important to determine exactly what the symptoms are. Let's look at six common scenarios.



Does it repeat with the die?

For example, if the tool is four around, does every fourth label cut too deep? If so, you may have a high spot on one of the blades. If it's a solid tool, it must be retooled. If it's a flexible tool, a new die should be ordered.


Does the die cut too deep at a length that doesn't correspond to it?

Look first at the anvil. Inspect the anvil for wear and try the tool on a different anvil. If the issue goes away by changing anvils, then send the anvil to us. We'll inspect it and return in working condition.


Does the die cut too deep on or opposite the operator side?

If the die is reversible or it the die is a flexible tool, then turn the die around and see if the issue follows the tool or if it stays on the same side of the press. If it doesn't follow the tool, then chances are it's an anvil issue again. Send us the anvil for inspection and clean up.


Does the tool cut too deep on the outside?

You may have applied too much force to the tool and are causing the tool to flex, or bend. Try releasing some force until you get an even die cut across the tool.


Are the labels cut too deep in the center?

Typically, this issue occurs when the tool is not parallel to the anvil. Try using a fresh set of bearing blocks to resolve this situation.


Are sporadic labels cut too deep?

Check to make sure the die was ordered for the material you are cutting. Did you send material to have the tool tested? This is probably a material issue. Send back the tool with the material you are now attempting to cut.


Are all of the labels lifting?

Check to make sure the die was tooled to the correct material. Also, if there is a heavy coat weight of adhesive, you may not be able to have an auto die strike. The material may require a hand or hit-hard die strike to ensure the blades separate the adhesive.


Questions about cutting?

If you have additional questions or thoughts about how force affects your applications, we invite you to contact the technical team at Wilson. Click here to contact Wilson Manufacturing